Notify Me when Done “X” in KDE

One of the few Java webapps I work on at work, has a very long startup time. Unfortunately since the server startup code is proprietary and owned by the vendor, there is not much I can do about that. However it is easy to forget to check if the server has started up, I decided to that I needed a way for my computer to notify me that the webapp was up. Here is how I came up with a simple and quick way to do just that in KDE.

So my webapp has an health endpoint that can be easily queried via HTTP. With httpie the HTTP query was very easy, however to script httpie to keep querying until the result came back, meaning the server was up. At first I tried do a while with negation of the return code, and then I found on StackOverflow that the bash until command will do just that. (Without needing to figure out the appropriate negation).

The second part was figuring how to create notifications in KDE via the console. Turns out that kdialog will create both notifications and general popup alerts.

Putting the two together I came up:

until http :8080/my_health_endpoint; do echo 'Waiting...'; sleep 10; done; kdialog --passivepopup "Ready to go!" 10`

I added a sleep in there, to throttle the number of times that httpie would run. The second parameter on the kdialog dictates how long the notification popup will be around. Alternatively I could of used --msgbox if I wanted a dialog that I had to press ‘OK’ on.

Resources

Approaching Inbox Zero in Gmail

Earlier this year (yes I meant to send this out much earlier) I went to a meetup hosted by my local PyLadies group. There Tracy Osborn of Wedding Lovely and Hello Web App fame gave an amazing talk about marketing for developers. I was truly inspired by the talk, and I feel it was very relevant for me, especially as I try to launch my first product and startup Amber Penguin Software. I could write a series of blog posts just on the content from this one meetup alone, and I probably will over time. But today I’ll focus on one thing in particular that I’ve learned from Tracy.

Getting to Inbox Zero

Nowadays I try to not organize my day to day tasks, by either my inbox or even one of my many, many Trello boards. Rather I try to bite off a few urgent and important tasks each day. Still I end up spending time on tasks initiated from emails in my email inbox. Unfortunately my inboxes seems to fill up faster than I can manage them at times. I would love to have a clean inbox as in Inbox Zero technique but more importantly I want to be much more responsive to the emails I get. Also opening up my email can be overwhelming when I see the number of emails in my inbox.

Using Multiple Inboxes in Gmail

One of the things I learned after the meetup, while browsing Tracy’s site was a technique to get my inbox under control at least in Gmail. In essence, you need to enable the “Multiple Inboxes” lab experiment in the Gmail Labs settings. Then you need to write a few filters such as is:drafts || label:follow-up (which happens to be my filter for follow-up emails) for each particular inbox. Et voilĂ ! You have a much more manageable inbox that is subdivided into categories, and the actions you need to take.

Where it works and where it doesn’t work

Unfortunate this technique only works in Gmail at the moment. Some other webmail providers maybe have a similar multiple inbox solution, but unfortunately ProtonMail does not but it is a suggested feature. So my ProtonMail will probably lag behind in terms of how quickly I respond, unless I or someone else implements the multiple inbox feature in ProtonMail.

However where I can use multiple inboxes like in my Amber Penguin Software email (managed by Gmail) it has drastically improved my email experience and my own responsiveness. My Gmail still needs some love to get everything under control, but once I do I will be much better at replying to emails. Ultimately this technique helps you become more confident in categorizing your email, and then acting up on it when the time comes.

Post PyCon, ebook and Freelancing Plans

PyCon US 2017 has come and gone, and the past few weeks have been busy with renovations and family related activities. So I have not been able to write as much as I’d like to. But now life is starting to gain some normality, and I look forward to more regular blogging.

I really enjoyed PyCon this year. I ended up spending a lot of time in the so-called hallway track, meeting old friends, new folks and learning about interesting projects and companies. I still have quite a large queue of talks to watch on Youtube on the PyCon 2017 channel. I did get to talk to Guido, and ask him about how one should approach development with the new async/await functionality in Python 3. In general, I am floored how friendly everyone was, and how many amazing conversations I had.

I stuck around for the coding sprints, as I try to for every PyCon. I worked on APIStar (a cool new simple Python 3 web framework that uses type annotations), Paramiko and Ansible, and managed to be fairly productive. A bunch of PRs were addressed in the docker_* modules for Ansible. Paramiko finally got some Flake8 love. And APIStar now has better support for reverse routing.)

Aside from meeting with people, I enjoyed spending time in and around Portland. I do have to hand it to Portlanders, they have a lot of great restaurants and micro-breweries. Some of my friends involved in Fabric fact got me on the Untappd app just to keep track of the various brews I got a chance to try out. Another pleasant surprise was the swing dancing scene in Portland, especially everyone involved with Stumptown Dance. But definitely the most fun I had was visiting some friends I made in Portland, and also hiking outside of Portland. (Namely going to the Pacific Coast, and the various falls around Multnomah Falls.)

I do miss Portland, and I do hope to be back there sometime in the near future. In the meantime, I plan on trying something new. While my attempts at building a product have been informative, they have stalled simply because of the amount of work and long time of getting to market. So I’ll be trying something new: I’m open to working freelance on mobile (Kivy), Python web app and API projects through my startup: Amber Penguin Software. Feel to contact me if you have an interesting projects that you’d like me to work on.

More important I will be working on an ebook about two modern web dev tools that I use: (jq and httpie). If there is interest in this ebook, then I have ideas for other ones on Kivy, Ansible and Docker. If you are interested, please subscribe to the mailing list using the form below and I’ll keep you up to date on my progress. I will also be doing this through my startup just to keep things organized, and to enable me to bring on people as needed.

Pythonistas in Portlandia – PyCon US 2017

Apologies for being silent these past few months. I tried to concentrate on launching a product earlier in the year, and I was hopeful that I would get it out soon. Unfortunately it didn’t work out and I will have to shelf development.

That said, I am looking forward to going to Portland and PyCon US 2017 this weekend. I will be also at the sprints next week too. Not presenting a talk this year, but I am looking forward to meeting everyone attending. Message me on twitter @dorianpula and maybe we’ll be able to meet up if you are going.

So much Writing and Coding… so Little Time

I must apologize to regular readers of my blog, that I have been slacking. I plan on writing a blog entry once a week, and even though this one is late, I am trying to keep my promises. At least one should keep promises to one self. And I apologize if this entry is a bit sparse. It is a bit “phoned in”, I guess.

Anyways, I have been keeping busy with my many projects. Because of this I feel like I am pulling myself in a bunch of directions at the same time. This feels counterproductive and progress is slow. But I’m not sure of a better way to progress forward. I fear concentrating on one project, will just make everything else fall behind. Basically what I’m saying is that I’m trying to show some real progress on my open source projects, my not-so-open-source product, my writing, and bunch of other things… but yeah… it may be a while before I have anything substantial to show. Sorry.

Don’t even ask about all my emails… it is all a bit overwhelming. I will try to get back to everyone… but there really is so much to do. And only one of me… sigh…

In the meantime, I will try to keep up with the blogging. Maybe about some tips and tricks, but no real long articles for now. At least until I feel things get more manageable.

Anyways, take care and see you next week!

PyCon CA 2016 – The Art of Writing Wargames in Python with Kivy

Intro

Last year in November, I presented a talk about Kivy at PyCon Canada 2016. I talked about my experiences working with Kivy in the context of writing a strategy game. I discussed the various UI frameworks available to a Python developer, and why Kivy is currently the best choices for UIs in Python. Especially if you are interested in making a cross-platform app or game.

Video

Links

Abstract

Many of us got our start in programming, by building games and simple apps. However creating interesting games and UIs in Python was not a simple task especially for multiple platforms. Kivy, a cross-platform Python UI app framework changes all that. This talk discusses the journey of working with Kivy to develop a moderately complex strategy game. It also contrasts to using other platforms

Reaction

Overall, the talk went better than I expected. The audience was engaged and interested. There was a few technical difficulties, namely I had to resort to using my phone as a wifi hotspot to run my presentation rather than Ryerson University’s wifi. Also there was a noticeable delay between when I changed slides on my presentation notes, and the projected display. This kind of delay is probably the only downside of using slides.com this time around. Having a local copy would of worked better, which I will do so in the future.

Also I wish I had more time to come up with a better demo for the presentation. However even after the sprints, the hex grid layout still plagues my Kivy app. In hindsight, I probably should of worked on a simpler app. Also some folks were turned off by the use of wargames, rather general games. But you know, you learn from your mistakes.

Finally I got quite a few questions, and people are genuinely interested in checking out Kivy. Which ultimately was what I was trying to achieve with this talk.

Encrypt All the Things!

This week has been a rough one for me, so I’ll keep this blog entry short.

However I am pleased to announce that after a bit of struggle, I have setup HTTPS on all my sites, including this one. Thanks to Let’s Encrypt and specifically the acme-nginx project to making that possible. Getting everything setup, and automated using Ansible took a bit of work, but in the end it was worth it.

In the future I am looking forward to using the new more secure TLS 1.3 standard once it is supported more widely by NGINX and various browsers.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2017!

Hey Readers,

Sorry for the delay between posts. I went on an unannounced hiatus, just because of the busyness of last year. However I am back, and I will return to my regular posting schedule of once a week, most likely either Wednesday or Thursday morning.

Also I hope everyone had a Merry Christmas (or has if you’re celebrating the 12 days of Christmas), and I hope your New Year is happy, bright and full of promise!

— Dorian

Avoiding Blank PHP Responses after upgrading to Ubuntu 16.04, and php7.0-fpm

Earlier this week I finally made the plunge to upgrade my VPS to Ubuntu 16.04. With a minor hiccup surrounding supervisord (which I probably can avoid if I go the systemd route) not being enabled at boot, the upgrade was simple for both my WSGI and Node webapps.

I can not say the same thing about my WordPress/PHP installations. (Installations that I hope to transition off to Rookeries once that software becomes more stable.) It took me a few hours to track down and resolve the problems. Hence I am posting this article, to hopefully save someone else’s time when they do the same upgrade.

Upgrading to PHP 7.0

Ubuntu 16.04 makes the switch away from PHP 5 to PHP 7. So I had to switch to php7.0, php7.0-fpm, and php7.0-mysql from their PHP 5 equivalents. The location of the running UNIX socket has changed from /var/run/php5-fpm.sock to /var/run/php/php7.0-fpm.sock, as did the PID files.

Updating the PHP-FPM configuration

Running WordPress using FPM (Fast Process Manager) and NGINX, requires turning off the path translation in php.ini file. This can be done by uncommenting the line cgi.fix_pathinfo=0 found in the configuration file /etc/php/7.0/fpm/php.ini. Again these files have moved from the old location. After you’ve done this remember to restart the FPM service using the new systemd utilities: sudo systemctl restart php7.0-fpm.

Updating the NGINX configuration and Solving the Blank Response

This is the tricky part. After updating my NGINX configurations to the new UNIX socket path, and restarting NGINX, I found that I got blank PHP responses. Everything else worked, expect that any PHP page would not render. And not render by not rendering any content in the body of the responses. That led me down a few rabbit holes, and researching how to re-architecture my setup using Docker. Eventually I stumbled across a blog entry with the solution to the blank PHP response issue.

In a nutshell, with the NGINX upgrade one of the parameters needed for FastCGI went missing namely the fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME $document_root$fastcgi_script_name; bit. Oddly this parameter appears in /etc/nginx/fastcgi.conf and not the /etc/nginx/fastcgi_params file that I normally include in my NGINX configs. Anyways after adding this line and restarting NGINX using sudo systemctl restart nginx everything worked correctly. Below I’ve included a sample NGINX configuration that should work.

Sample NGINX Configuration /etc/nginx/site-enabled/example-site.conf

“`
server {
server_name .example-site.com;
index index.php;
root /srv/www/location_of_wordpress_install;
listen 80;

access_log      /var/logs/nginx/site-access.log;
error_log       /var/logs/nginx/site-error.log info;

location / {
    try_files       $uri $uri/ /index.php$args;
}

location ~ \.php$ {                        
    fastcgi_split_path_info     ^(.+\.php)(/.+)$;
    fastcgi_pass    unix:/var/run/php/php7.0-fpm.sock;
    fastcgi_index   index.php;
    fastcgi_param   SCRIPT_FILENAME    $document_root$fastcgi_script_name;
    include         fastcgi_params;
}

location ~* \.(js|css|png|jpg|jpeg|gof|ico)$ {
    expires         max;
    log_not_found   off;
}

}
“`